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Author Topic: Brakes - all you need to know and more...  (Read 17000 times)
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Wittsend
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« on: September 20, 2006, 08:11:42 PM »

Please note that the diagrams in the various manuals are not all that clear how the shoes and springs are fitted.
To the best of our knowledge these pictures show the correct arrangements.
(If you are at all unsure as to what you are doing, please seek professional advice.)



SWB 10" brakes...




You are looking at the off-side (driver's side for a RH drive vehicle, brake backplate for either the front or rear axle.
NOTE the adjuster cam always faces the front of the vehicle, same for both sides of the vehicle.

(note this is the early S2 backplate with the shoe steady posts)






This shows the general layout of the 10" brakes, the front axle is just the same (except the bore of the wheel cylinders is slightly larger at 1.25"). The cylinders are "handed" and note the tail on the "banjo" ring on the bottom anchor plate faces to the rear.


This is the off-side rear wheel cylinder. The brake hydraulic input pipe should face the rear of the vehicle to allow for a more natural bend in the pipes.
NOTE
This is contrary to what is shown in the manuals and parts book.
I believe that at some point in the past someone has mistaken the near & off-side part numbers and transposed them.




These pics show exactly how the top spring is located. Note it clears under the snail cam adjuster and should not touch or be connected to the adjuster... If the spring is bent or distorted, replace it.


LWB 11" brakes

The front and rear brakes are different.

11" LWB rear brakes




This is how the springs fit on the rear brake shoes.
BUT NOTE that the springs go on the inside of the shoes in the same way as they do in the 10" setup.
Once again all the manuals are misleading on this point!






11" LWB front brakes



Note only one wheel cylinder is shown and that they are "handed".






And you will find this link to TeriAnn's very useful.... LWB brakes

Adjuster Kits




This picture shows the assembly for SWB brakes.

We are still building this information section and I hope to add to it as and when....

The topic is locked, so any questions, queries, comments; please start a new topic off in the Mechanical section.

 cheers_man



« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 10:09:27 AM by Wittsend » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2007, 11:03:12 PM »

Here are the relevant pages from the Green Bible with regard to the Hand Brake (transmission brake) mechanism.





















 :-X
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2008, 09:57:52 PM »

From David Dutton's archives...
as in Winter 2006 B2L, page 15.

A Land-Rover Service Newsletter describing how to adjust the rear brake shoes on 109 models....



And as a pdf Download

Please note 109 2A rear brakes have 2 adjusters per wheel.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2011, 06:49:06 AM by Wittsend » Logged
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2008, 06:21:16 PM »

Start with the basics   znaika
Adjust the pedal height:-

Here's Mark Rumsey's advice....


1) Remove the top cover from the pedal box and slacken the pushrod nuts.
2) Make sure the return spring is fitted to the pedal inside the vehicle.
3) Using the stop bolt on the front of the pedal box, adjust the pedal height to 6.25".
4) Adjust the inner pushrod nut until the pushrod is lightly gripped between the pedal and piston. Before doing this make sure the piston is fully out.
5) Slacken the nut off between 1 and 2 flats so the pushrod is no longer gripped and has a little 'rattle'. Don't bother trying to set the 3/16" freeplay  specified as that won't compensate for wear in the pedal trunnion, whereas the 'lightly grip' method does.
6) Tighten the outer locknut and check the pedal for operation.

That should be it. Please pay special attention to no2. If the spring is not pulling the pedal all the way up the spring inside the cylinder is all that will be trying to return the pedal to its normal position, and it isn't strong enough. As a result, the piston won't return and pressure will build up in the system causing the brakes to lock on.

« Last Edit: August 13, 2011, 04:58:27 PM by Wittsend » Logged
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« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2008, 08:51:17 PM »

Some info on the S3 "dual" braking system and how to bleed the brakes....


The brake warning lamp

more about the dual system

Bleeding the brakes on a dual system Land Rover

more about the S3 braking systeml


 cheers_man
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2009, 11:32:32 AM »

OK Green Bible data coming up.... :manual

For 10" diameter brakes (SWB)
Standard diameter is 10" +/- 4 thou
Reclamation limit = 30 thou over-size on diameter.

and For 11" brakes (LWB)
Standard diameter is 11" +/- 4 thou
Reclamation limit is 30 thou over-size on the diameter.


I was the custom in the old days to skim (reclaim) drums to remove wear ridges and ovality.

This was done in your local garage on a special lathe/rig for the purpose.
This was considerably cheaper than buying a new drum.

It would make sense these days, given the reported uncertainty of quality, to check new drums out before fitting.

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« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2009, 12:35:06 PM »

A useful link about Triumph braking systems...

HERE


A lot of the stuff discussed is relevant to Series Land Rovers
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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2010, 09:26:11 AM »

Here's something I posted a while ago....


Adjustment of shoes can cause difficulties for folks new to these things.

New shoes, especially will scuff on the drum - you will hear a rubbing noise.
It will take time for new shoes to properly bed in and match up to the drum.

You need to adjust each shoe (in turn) so that the drum/wheel can't turn - i.e. locked up solid.
Then you back off the adjuster 2 notches. The cam has ridges that the shoe pin rests on, as you turn against the shoe springs it feels "notchy" This is your starting point. You may need to tweak the adjuster tighter one in or one out. If you turn out, you will almost certainly need to re-adjust after the shoes have bedded in - say 500 road miles.

You then tackle the other adjuster/shoe.

Note that the Land Rover Wheel WON'T spin freely for ever. 4 or so complete turns is the best you'll get with a hand push - and that's when you'll hear the scuffing.

If you adjust the shoes too tightly then the drum will get very hot after a short test drive. Re-adjust.

You do need to go on a little test drive.... I can do this just outside my house as the road is flat and we live on a quiet cul-de-sac.
So you drive along going straight at a brisk walking pace. Steady the wheel on the rim in the palms of your hands.
Now stamp on the brake pedal.

Did the vehicle pull up straight  eclipsee_gold_cup
Did the vehicle pull to one side or the other  nixweiss
If so you need to check the shoe(s) adjustment on the opposite side.

Continue with your test drive (gently). On returning feel each drum. They should be cool - maybe a little warm, depends how much braking you had to do. Try not to brake on the test drive. If one drum is hot, the shoes are binding - attend to it. (Sometimes a faulty or badly adjusted master cylinder can lock all the shoes on and all the drums will get hot  shakinghead)

Once adjusted correctly (the vehicle stops straight) then you'll probably not need to readjust for several thousand miles - the pedal just goes long. Of course this very much depends how you drive and where you live. Out here in the flat lands of the East we don't have too many hills.


 RHD

To re-cap:
You must be able to lock each wheel to the drum on the adjuster.

You back-off the adjuster 2 "clicks". The wheel will spin - not necessarily freely for ever. You will hear scuffing and rubbing. New shoes - new drums need to bed and wear in.
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« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2010, 01:35:21 PM »

And by courtesy of trueS2.....

List of Girling Brake parts for Land Rovers

 RHD

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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2013, 10:32:07 AM »

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