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Author Topic: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?  (Read 661 times)

w3526602

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Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« on: November 25, 2021, 04:09:05 AM »

Hi,

First let me confirm that both I, and Barbara, have had our eyesight checked by an optician, during a home visit to fit Barbara with reading specs during Lockdown. He pronounced us both fit to drive (within the limits of his professional competence).

Obviously, it would not be a good idea to rely on one's Seeing Eye dog to navigate your way to the pub and back.

But a driving licence is a useful document to have, if you need to prove your identity, or that you are old enough to drink alcohol, etc.

Many yonks ago, somewhere, somewhen, but probably within the confines of the DVLC library, in the 1970s or 1980s, I read that poor eyesight does not prevent one from holding a licence to drive a PEDESTRIAN CONTROLLED VEHICLE.

I don't know if that was the official opinion, but I have difficulty visualising somebody arriving, with a garden cultivator, at a driving test centre. :thud I have no difficulty imagining an S2 fitted with hand controls and steering wheel nailed to the tailgate, with the driver walking behind.

What ever, if you, or a loved one, have been medically debarred (which isn't the same as criminally disqualified), due to poor eyesight it may be worth trying to push the "Jobsworth" boundaries.

I would argue that replacing your B+E licence with whatever group covers pedestrian controlled vehicles, should be a FREE REPLACEMENT

Whatever, if the above applies to you, it might be worth a try.

602

PS, I believe that REFUSING TO TAKE AN EYESIGHT TEST, is, or was, worth one penalty point.

PPS. A provisional licence holder must be accompanied by somebody who HOLDS a current licence for the vehicle being driven by the learner.
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Wittsend

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Re: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2021, 03:43:00 PM »

YES - is the answer.

There are thousands of blind drivers out there on the roads with full driving licenses.
You see (sic) them every day when you venture out on the roads  :thud

The "Driving Test" eyesight test is not that rigorous. Just remember all the reg numbers in the car park before you go in.

 :-\
All drivers should have to produce an eyesight test pass from an optician and wear the appropriate glasses as prescribed, for the driving test. Wouldn't be that hard to implement - but of course, it won't ever happen  :shakeinghead

If you want a driving license easy enough to get a forgery (or an imposter to take the test) if you have the cash.



 :L-plates 
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w3526602

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Re: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2021, 09:47:54 AM »

Hi Alan,

When I had a team of Medical Enforcers at DVLA, (there were five teams) I would reckon on getting a steady five new reports every day, about candidates failing there driving test, before they even got into the car. They couldn't read  a number plate.

We should have pulled their licence there and then, but DVLC has a heart. We gave then 14 days to provide an opticians report certifying that their eyesight was up to standard ... usually (always?) followed with a request for a replacement (free) licence showing a photo of them wearing spectacles.

How can a driving school get somebody to test standard, without confirming that they can see? Their eyesight should be verified by the Front Office, before they take their money for their first lesson. BY LAW.

Would the Law reqard such negligence as "aiding and abetting" negligent driving, if a pedestrian was killed by a blind learner driver?

602

602
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Wittsend

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Re: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2021, 12:08:01 PM »

Well now ... you can put yourself in for a driving test.

Driving test candidates are not all put up by a driving school  :shakeinghead

You need to go back to your data to find how many driving school candidates fail the number plate test  :stars

If a driving school pupil has an accident that are covered by the school's insurance.

Over all the years of driving tests I can't imagine that there have been that many accidents directly attributable to a blind learner driver.
Therefore it's not seen (sic) as a problem.

Providing a photo of the holder wearing glasses is a nonsense.
They could be false glasses, people could also wear false beards and tashes.
I believe the criteria for a driving license photo are the same as for a passport photo.
No glasses or hats to be worn.

 :agh

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autorover1

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Re: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2021, 01:26:55 PM »

Now I am over 70 and want to keep my C1/ D1 entitlement I have to have my eyesight tested before each renewal .
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w3526602

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Re: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2021, 11:39:08 PM »

I believe the criteria for a driving license photo are the same as for a passport photo.

Hi Alan,

My memory tells me that if specs are required to drive, they will be shown on your driving licence. If you needed specs to read the number plate as requested by the examiner, it will be hidden, but present, in the secret codes on your licence.

OT ... I once dealt with a Test Pass for a driver required to have the car adapted to accomadate "Shortness of Stature". The poor bloke had taken his test while sitting on a cushion.

602
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w3526602

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Re: Can you hold FULL driving licence despite poor eyesight?
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2021, 07:36:06 AM »

I believe the criteria for a driving license photo are the same as for a passport photo.

Hi,

OT ... but discuss if you like.

Barbara's BLUE BADGE (disabled parking) has expired. Not problem, as she has only once travelled as a passenger (ungent visit to the dentist) and we managed found a standard parking bay right outside. I reckon it took her about 20 minutes, and attracted a lot of interest, getting from her wheelchair back into the passenger seat.

It seems that disabled parking bays may only be used by holders of blue badges, or cars carrying holders of blue badges. It seems to be irrelevant if a person is disabled, but does not actually hold a blur badge ...they are not entitled to park on a disabled bay.

Barbara has also driven once (recently) since lock-down. She seemed safe to my eyes, but she admits there are things that need addressing ... she found the clutch pedal very heavy, for instance. Getting into the driver's seat was easier, as the steering wheel could be used as a struggling bar.

Where can we find details of "mechanical handing", without getting a local Main Dealer all excited?

Being over 65, Barbara is entitled to NO financial assistance (EG, Motability) other than Invalid Care Allowance.

There is also a Disability Facilities Grant for necessary Home Alterations, but they are Means Tested. It took the Social Worker about two seconds to scan our bank statement, and declare us to be NOT ENTITLED. However, DFG grants below £1,000 are NOT means tested, and you can keep coming back for more.

My knees are getting bad ... I now walk with a pronounced "mince", and cannot bend either leg more than 90*. The plan is to ask our health insurers to finance (£650) a consultation with a local, private Occupational Therapist, to ask for a chitty to say I need a Blue Badge. The insurers have already bought me a pair of new eyes, and paid to have a hole drilled in my skull.

Growing old? Be afraid!

602

PS, Our builder came in, lifted the old WC bowl by three inches, replaced the seat with a wooden version ... with a couple of door-stops screwed underneath, to prevent it being "hammered" sideways.
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